NACM Drives Innovation with New Brand Identity

Columbia, Md., Feb. 3, 2017 — The National Association of Credit Management (NACM), which represents thousands of business credit and financial professionals worldwide, revealed a fresh, modern icon and logo that will unify brand identity between its national organization and its many Affiliates. A tagline accompanying the design, “Driving Results,” reflects the organization’s central values.

“This is a big step,” said 2017 NACM Chairman Jay Snyder, CCE, ICCE. “The nationwide unification of the NACM brand will drive consistency and growth for our Affiliates and national headquarters. NACM is a great organization, which I believe can have even more impact on today’s credit practitioners. I’m excited to see what’s next as we continue to serve the credit community.”

The logo features the NACM name in a modern, bold font at the center of a dynamic arrow-and-wheel design. The circular movement inherent in the logo represents progress and momentum in the facilitation of corporate cash flow that lies at the core of NACM’s mission. An organization founded in the 19th century now moves into the 21st with a contemporary graphical identity visible across multiple digital platforms and recognizable at any scale.

“We learned that a rebrand entails much more than a new logo,” said Gary Gaudette, CCE, ICCE, past NACM chairman. “It’s an opportunity to explore what makes our organization unique and valuable. We uncovered our essential value, which is ‘Driving Results.’”

The logo will be consistent throughout the organization. An Affiliate version will feature each Affiliate’s name. The new brand identity will roll out locally to the organization’s Affiliates, with complete fulfillment expected by year end.

 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CREDIT MANAGEMENT
NACM, headquartered in Columbia, MD, supports more than 14,000 business credit and financial professionals worldwide with premier industry services, tools and information. NACM and its network of affiliated associations are the leading resource for credit and financial management information, education, products and services designed to improve the management of business credit and accounts receivable. NACM’s collective voice has influenced federal legislative policy results concerning commercial business and trade credit to our nation’s policy makers for more than 100 years, and continues to play an active part in legislative issues pertaining to business credit and corporate bankruptcy. NACM's annual Credit Congress & Exposition conference is the largest gathering of credit professionals in the world. Website: www.nacm.org

The September economic report from the shows an improved combined overall score above 50.

The September report of the Credit Managers’ Index (CMI) from the National Association of Credit Management (NACM) recovered from its August dip, bringing it in line with a combined score seen in July.

The CMI’s combined score moved from 52.0 to 53.7. “This month may be an anomaly, but we certainly hope not,” said NACM Economist Chris Kuehl, Ph.D. “The best news is that the gains were seen primarily in the favorable categories.” In August, the combined score for the index of favorable factors fell to levels not seen since December 2015; in September, however, it rose to 59.5 from 56.4, month-on-month.

Dollar collections made a strong recovery as it returned to July’s number of 59.5, up four points from August. Sales and new credit applications also rebounded well, 53.7 to 57.9 and 56.7 to 58.6, respectively, and amount of credit extended improved further as it went from 59.7 to 61.9.

Even though the index of unfavorable factors improved slightly as it shifted from 49.1 to 49.9, some categories continue to drag down the whole index. Overall, most of the categories held close to the numbers reflected in August. The most significant improvement was in dollar amount beyond terms (46.3 to 48.2), which suggests more customers are paying within terms. And although rejections of credit applications stayed roughly the same (51.6 to 51.3), “it’s actually pretty good news,” Kuehl said, because of the increase in applications.

“It is hoped that this data is a harbinger of things to come, but after the last few months of intense gyrations, there is certainly no guarantee,” Kuehl shared. “The business community as a whole has been cautious and uneasy and has not been eager to make commitments for the future. That has been affecting the CMI, but now there is some sense that decisions will be made in the not distant future.” Most of the progress can be attributed to the manufacturing sector, he added. “Service is lagging for now and at this point it may be a couple of months before there is a reversal.”

For a full breakdown of the manufacturing and service sector data and graphics, view the complete September 2016 report here. CMI archives may also be viewed on NACM’s website here.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CREDIT MANAGEMENT

NACM, headquartered in Columbia, Maryland, supports more than 15,000 business credit and financial professionals worldwide with premier industry services, tools and information. NACM and its network of affiliated associations are the leading resource for credit and financial management information, education, products and services designed to improve the management of business credit and accounts receivable. NACM’s collective voice has influenced federal legislative policy results concerning commercial business and trade credit to our nation’s policy makers for more than 100 years, and continues to play an active part in legislative issues pertaining to business credit and corporate bankruptcy. NACM's annual Credit Congress & Exposition conference is the largest gathering of credit professionals in the world.

 

Contact: Diana Mota, Associate Editor, 410-740-5560, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.nacm.org
Source: National Association of Credit Management

The August economic report of NACM’s Credit Managers’ Index shows a combined overall score above 50, but falling.

Good news in the August Credit Managers’ Index (CMI) from the National Association of Credit Management (NACM) is short-lived. Although the combined score and index of favorable factors sit above 50 in expansion territory, that’s where the good news ends.

The combined manufacturing and service score reached a low (52.0) not seen for more than two years. The score reflects the month-on-month deterioration of favorable categories which went from 60.0 to 56.4. In comparison, unfavorable factors contracted slightly (49.2 to 49.1). “The best that can be said about the decline is that it was bad and hasn’t gotten much worse,” said NACM Economist Chris Kuehl, Ph.D. “The most vexing part of the change is that it is happening at the start of the season that many in the economy count on for growth.”

Of the favorable factors, the sales category fell the hardest (60.0 to 53.7)—another two-year low. “The sales collapse meshes with the Purchasing Managers’ Index and other statistics, so it is unlikely an anomaly,” Kuehl said. New credit applications took a softer fall (57.8 to 56.7), and dollar collections dipped (59.5 to 55.5) to a number not seen since December. Although it appeared amount of credit extended had started to normalize in the 60s, this month it slipped (62.8 to 59.7). “Amount of credit extended is important as this reflects credit issuance to the larger clients and customers as they are the ones that will be seeking the most,” Kuehl said.

Unfavorable categories remained weak overall even with minor improvements in rejections of credit applications and disputes, 50.7 to 51.6 and 47.6 to 47.8, respectively. “The only companies accessing credit are the good customers and the ones least likely to be turned down,” Kuehl said. Filings for bankruptcies grew from 50.7 to 52.8. “This reading has stayed fairly steady for the bulk of the year and signals that most of the credit crisis has been as expected,” he said. Accounts placed for collection had the lowest reading since November 2015, dropping from 48.2 to 47.7. Dollar amount beyond terms (48.8 to 46.3) and dollar amount of customer deductions (49.0 to 48.1) also both fell. “The bottom line as far as the unfavorable factors are concerned is that things have not started to improve any, but they are not getting any worse either.”

For a full breakdown of the manufacturing and service sector data and graphics, view the complete August 2016 report here. CMI archives may also be viewed on NACM’s website here.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CREDIT MANAGEMENT

NACM, headquartered in Columbia, Maryland, supports more than 15,000 business credit and financial professionals worldwide with premier industry services, tools and information. NACM and its network of affiliated associations are the leading resource for credit and financial management information, education, products and services designed to improve the management of business credit and accounts receivable. NACM’s collective voice has influenced federal legislative policy results concerning commercial business and trade credit to our nation’s policy makers for more than 100 years, and continues to play an active part in legislative issues pertaining to business credit and corporate bankruptcy. NACM's annual Credit Congress & Exposition conference is the largest gathering of credit professionals in the world.

 

Contact: Diana Mota, Associate Editor, 410-740-5560, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.nacm.org
Source: National Association of Credit Management

The July economic report of NACM’s Credit Managers’ Index from NACM shows a turnaround from the previous month’s trends.

Mirroring the volatility in the economy, the July report of the Credit Managers’ Index (CMI) from the National Association of Credit Management (NACM) saw some factors gain while others declined.

“We saw job creation numbers crash to levels not seen since the recession in May and jump back to nearly record levels in June,” noted NACM Economist Chris Kuehl, Ph.D. “The latest durable goods numbers are down due to the reduction in export activity, but the housing sector is showing more strength than it has since before the downturn. Now we see some of that back and forth in the CMI data as well.”

The combined (manufacturing and service sectors ) score regained some momentum in July and is now at 53.5 after having been down to 52.7 last month. Most of the extreme activity, however, is seen in the various subcategories. The combined index of favorable factors improved enough to get back into the 60 range where it has been three times in the past year. Its strength shows up in growth through all four of its categories, which are in the high 50s or low 60s. This is a trend that needs to continue if there is to be any progress in the economy overall.

The combined index of unfavorable factors showed more distress as this is the second-consecutive month with a sub-50 reading. Of the six subcategories, only two, rejections of credit applications and filings for bankruptcies, are above the line (50) that divides contraction from expansion.

Concerning credit applications, Kuehl commented, “the fact that applications are up but approvals are down indicates that there are more companies in trouble and hoping they find a supplier that will give them credit regardless. There are not that many gullible companies out there these days; and therefore, there are more rejections.”

As for the other four unfavorable categories, they are hovering below 50. Volatility is evident as shown in both the favorable and unfavorable indexes of all categories with the first trending upward and the other downward in each case.

For a full breakdown of the manufacturing and service sector data and graphics, view the complete July 2016 report here. CMI archives may also be viewed on NACM’s website here.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CREDIT MANAGEMENT

NACM, headquartered in Columbia, Maryland, supports more than 15,000 business credit and financial professionals worldwide with premier industry services, tools and information. NACM and its network of affiliated associations are the leading resource for credit and financial management information, education, products and services designed to improve the management of business credit and accounts receivable. NACM’s collective voice has influenced federal legislative policy results concerning commercial business and trade credit to our nation’s policy makers for more than 100 years, and continues to play an active part in legislative issues pertaining to business credit and corporate bankruptcy. NACM's annual Credit Congress & Exposition conference is the largest gathering of credit professionals in the world.

 

Contact: Diana Mota, Associate Editor, 410-740-5560, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.nacm.org
Source: National Association of Credit Management

The June economic report of NACM’s Credit Managers’ Index shows numbers still in the expansion zone but at their weakest level for the calendar year.

Amid returned deterioration in several industries, the June report of the Credit Managers’ Index (CMI) from the National Association of Credit Management (NACM) showed conditions dropping to their worst level since November.

The combined CMI reading for the manufacturing and services sectors slipped to 52.7, down from May’s 53.8. However, the favorable factors categories remained significantly closer to 60 than the contraction zone (anything below 50). Notably, the results don’t take into account the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union.

“Since the statistics were collected prior to the ‘Brexit’ explosion, all eyes will be on the data coming in a month or so,” said NACM Economist Chris Kuehl, Ph.D. “The first place a crisis is likely to show up will be in the unfavorable factors, as companies that have exposure to the U.K. or Europe will possibly see more disputes, needs for collection action and bankruptcies,” said NACM Economist Chris Kuehl, Ph.D.

The unfavorable factors categories in June illustrated the greatest strain, as their aggregate reading slipped below last month’s 51 level and into contraction territory at 49.9. In all this month, four of the six unfavorable categories now sit in contraction territory. There was a small drop in the category of rejections of credit applications from 51.9 to 51.2. This reading likely indicates that companies are requesting less credit rather than a matter of creditors reducing what they are offering—if there was a developing trend of creditor reluctance, it likely would have started to show up here.

“The dark clouds on the manufacturing horizon include a decline in the sales of new cars and the potential drop in export demand as the dollar gains a lot more strength against the pound and the euro. How this will all play out remains to be seen,” said Kuehl. As for services, “there are still serious issues in the retail community, and the slow pace of consumer activity has not helped. There has been better news in the construction sector and in health care, but the consumer continues to vex the retailer and stunt growth.”

For a full breakdown of the manufacturing and service sector data and graphics, view the complete June 2016 report here. CMI archives may also be viewed on NACM’s website here.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CREDIT MANAGEMENT

NACM, headquartered in Columbia, Maryland, supports more than 15,000 business credit and financial professionals worldwide with premier industry services, tools and information. NACM and its network of affiliated associations are the leading resource for credit and financial management information, education, products and services designed to improve the management of business credit and accounts receivable. NACM’s collective voice has influenced federal legislative policy results concerning commercial business and trade credit to our nation’s policy makers for more than 100 years, and continues to play an active part in legislative issues pertaining to business credit and corporate bankruptcy. NACM's annual Credit Congress & Exposition conference is the largest gathering of credit professionals in the world.

 

Contact: Diana Mota, Associate Editor, 410-740-5560, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.nacm.org
Source: National Association of Credit Management